Lawrence Bender’s Movie ‘The Kill Bill Vol. 2.’

Lawrence Bender is a celebrated American movie producer. He was born on October 17, 1957, in Bronx, New York City. He has been in the industry of entertainment for 20 years now. He has featured in several movies like safe, innocent voices, Goodwill hunting, pulp fiction among others. He studied in Cherry Hill High School East. He later joined the University of Maine where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering. The main reason as to why Lawrence Bender perused this career was because his grandfather was a chemical engineer. Lawrence Bender admired his grandfather and wanted to be like him.

After graduating, he became a dancer. He danced for several years before his career was cut short as a result of an injury. Currently, Lawrence Bender is celebrated for having produced several movies that have played on our screens. As part of his profession, Lawrence was the chief producer of the movie ‘kill Bill vol.2’.The movie is an energetic celebration of filmmaking, freewheeling with unmindful joy running from one chapter to the other. It runs as a satire, works as drama, an Irony and pure action. The movie is a continuation of Kill Bill volume 1.

However, volume 2 stands on its own. The movie is all about countless kung-Fu drills that Tarantino has mastered. Moreover, he loves the moves so much. In the movie, Tarantino uses a sword. He does not seem like he’s copying but rather transcending skills. Some form of urgency is created in the movie as if some heat is being turned up under his memories.

The film starts as the bride, who goes by the name , is at the back seat of the car narrating her mission to assassinate Kill Bill. Some flashbacks reminded us when the pregnant bride’s entire wedding party was ruined and left her with a bullet in the head. Kill Bill volume 2 is filled with big characters that are well developed. One instance is the meeting between Bill and the bride. The scene consists of nonstop action and finally ends in a quiet and deadly punch line.

https://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/22/movies/a-film-maker-and-the-art-of-the-deal.html